Thursday, August 16, 2012

Some Thoughts On The Way The NEHRS Is Being Undertaken.

As reported below I was able to log on to my record and then notice a legion of problems. Later I was alerted to the fact that the system was in a System Maintenance window.

That I got into the system with no warning reveals utter incompetence on the part of those undertaking the project.

Further what sort of clinical system just goes off-line without some fall back procedures being in place? If there is not a secondary backup system - in some form - then the concept of a system for use in emergent situations is clearly not being catered for. A national system of this type is meant to offer virtually 100% availability and I have accidentally found 2 periods of over 5 hours in one week when it was off line.

Why provide emergency access to a system that may not be available and takes ages to log on to?

Clearly there are no responsible adults - let alone clinicians - defining how this system should resourced and behave.

Utterly hopeless.


Note @8:50am 16/8/2012. The System seems to be back to its normal and pretty useless and empty state.


Anonymous said...

Don't worry, be happy Jane Halton will fix it. She had some good practice recently with getting really angry at IBM when the Department's system unexpectedly (ie non scheduled) went down for a long time. She must be on the verge of getting angry with NEHTA and NEHTA's Board. Maybe angry is not a strong enough word - how about volcanically furious tumescent with rage.

I mean - what will they say to her when she gets angry with them - how about - this is what you wanted, this is what you got, don't blame us we told you not to do it this way but you just wouldn't listen.

Don't worry, be happy, we can fix it for you - and the cost will be ...... not exorbitant - just our normal commercial emergency pull-out-all-stops rates ... paid in advance of course.

B said...

(Adjunct) Professor Jane Halton is on the board of NEHTA.

It would seem to be either a conflict of interest of a failure of governance.

Anonymous said...

But didn't she say that only 5000 or so had signed up who's really bothered, right?
(Apart from those of us that give a damn about eHealth - and what you would expect to see for a billion bucks)