Thursday, September 29, 2016

The ADHA Releases A Short Video On The Benefits Of The myHR. Did You Find It Useful?

This popped up a little while ago:

Dr John Aloizos discusses My Health Record system benefits

Created on Friday, 16 September 2016
Dr John Aloizos, Clinical Advisor to the Australian Digital Health Agency, discusses how the My Health Record and digital technologies are helping his team at Garden City Medical Centre develop clinical pathways for patients with chronic and complex illnesses, and provide comprehensive care and service for their patients.
Here is the link:
I look forward to comments on how useful people found it.
David.

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

How amateurish. Full of unsubstantiated and bland claims of benefits
Apart from that - terrific.

Anonymous said...

"Dr John Aloizos, Clinical Advisor to the Australian Digital Health Agency", is paid how much for his 'advice'?

Anonymous said...

If he is the Clinical Advisor why do they want a committee to do that job?

Apart from the name change NEHTA to ADAH nothing much else seems to have changed. Perusing the Advisory Committee Expression of Interest criteria it looks very much like a whole new bureaucracy is being built so they can keep doing what they have always been doing; nothing new just the same old same old round and round the block.

Anonymous said...

How right you are, they retained the old guard, they may not be the top layer but they still control and will make any change for the better extremely difficult for the new EGMs.

Anonymous said...

So true - most importantly where is the new blood? Do health vendors have a voice and any influence going forward or will they continue to be relegated to the sidelines in a more repetition of meaningless superficial Clayton consultation sessions?

Anonymous said...

Do vendors have a voice? Telstra has screening registries and Accenture has Maddens mobile number, what more do you want?

Anonymous said...

There would have possibly been thinking that some sort of continuity at an upper level would help staff during the transition and changing of multiple CEO's. We should remember this must be a frustrating and confusing time for the staff. Hopefully the impression is that management is their for the staff not to secure a position then disappear on long extended holidays when their leadership would be most needed?

Anonymous said...

When a company is going nowhere or backwards, and achieving nothing, the good people move on. The ones who stay, either don't understand or can't find another job. Just saying.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps they like their Job or are you justifying to yourself that you are good because you can't see a job through? Just sating

Anonymous said...

Interesting question. If the "company is going nowhere or backwards, and achieving nothing" and they like working there, then I suggest a degree of cognitive dissonance.

And if the "company is going nowhere or backwards, and achieving nothing" that suggests that jobs don't get finished, or are not worth finishing.

Anonymous said...

I think you base the - going backwards and achieving nothing on a previous entity, it could be debated that previous entities stopped achieving so long ago that they had had gone backwards as far as they could. It has been only a month or so, there will be many viewpoints to consider and relationships to be built by the new entity. I think you are being unfair tarring all with the same brush, seperate those who do from those who spewed dilutions of self worth, some fresh ideas and approaches need to be heard and tested, let's see what the next five months holds.

Anonymous said...

Re: October 01, 2016 9:05 AM Do vendors have a voice? Telstra has screening registries and Accenture has Maddens mobile number, what more do you want?

You refer to the corporate blood suckers I was referring to the 'vendors' which deliver develop and deploy really useful functional software at the primary care coalface (medical practice, pathology, imaging, community health, messaging, etc)

Anonymous said...

I suspect that was the joke. The bureaucracy don't recognise main street as significant. They work in a "big" organization and they only respect other "big" organizations, even though there is failure after failure. I guess they probably think they are big enough to sue, not that Qld Health had any luck with that and there was the brilliant NASH created at a cost of $20M (by IBM) and then thrown away..

The bureaucracy lives in Dilberts world where nothing useful every gets done, but there are never any consequences because they are spending other peoples money. The Tax payers in fact, although a lot of it is borrowed these days. We could have $2B less debt with no PCEHR and we would be much better off!!!

The challenge for the small companies is not to get directed by the Bureaucracy to do stuff they don't see value in, that is getting harder and that is a real worry. What should we do? Say Wally is on the job?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
When a company is going nowhere or backwards, and achieving nothing, the good people move on. The ones who stay, either don't understand or can't find another job. Just saying.
October 01, 2016 11:41 AM

It reminds me of the 'cousin' to the ADHA, the Primary Health Networks (PHNs) and their predecessors. Being fair, their predicament is further acerbated by their continuing lack of formal KPIs from the Governing Political Parties (I am not going to get into demonising 'government'.). Perhaps they (the PHNs and the ADHA too) are being setup to fail?

Anonymous said...

Why would ADHA be setup to fail? Just because they have inherited all the old junk like MyHR, Terminology, NASH, SMD, and a few others that have not seen the light of day most have forgotten about them, but are not responsible for the new shinny stuff like Registeries, and left out in the cold regarding decision support, population health, health analytics etc....

Still might make a useful coral reef one day.

Anonymous said...

Give it time, we all know the stubborn folks that will need to be coax, the technology is the easy part, the actors are the hard part.