Quote Of The Year

Timeless Quotes - Sadly The Late Paul Shetler - "Its not Your Health Record it's a Government Record Of Your Health Information"

or

H. L. Mencken - "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."

Tuesday, April 23, 2024

We Reap What We Sow With Mental Health Services Provision!

This appeared last week

Psychiatrists warn mental health system is ‘under siege and stress’

Exclusive By Natasha Bita

Education Editor

8:27PM April 19, 2024

Psychotic and suicidal patients are being turned away from short-staffed public hospitals, as the nation’s health ministers work to plug gaping gaps between medical treatment and NDIS support for the mentally ill.

Frontline health and emergency workers have warned of a “dangerously broken” mental health system as hospitals overflow with mentally ill patients who are too poor to pay for ­private psychiatric help.

Professor Allan Fels, a former National Mental Health Commissioner who served on the Victorian Royal Commission into mental health, on Friday said he knew people who had killed themselves after hospitals refused to treat them.

"I know people who’ve been turned away from hospital taking their lives straight away,’’ he told The Weekend Australian.

“Most mental health services are not well organised and badly resourced, especially for the treatment of the homeless who are mentally ill.’’

Professor Fels said he felt the Bondi Junction massacre – when mentally ill man Joel Cauchi used a knife to murder six people and injure 12 others before a policewoman shot him dead last weekend – could have been prevented.

“My feeling was that if we had a better mental health system, including accommodation for people with severe mental illness, this tragic event might not have occurred,’’ he said.

“Tragically, (mental illness) is not a very high public priority and even within the health system, it’s much less of a priority than common illnesses such as cancer.

“But the Bondi experience could be a turning point.’’

The nation’s health ministers on Friday agreed to work on ways to support people with mental illness who do not qualify for support under the National Disability Support Scheme. he father of Joel Cauchi, the man who killed six people in Bondi Junction's Westfield, has spoken out about why… he believes his son targeted women in the horrific attack. “He wanted a girlfriend, and he’s got no social skills, and he was frustrated out of his brain,” Andrew More

Federal Health Minister Mark Butler, who met state and territory health ministers in Brisbane on Friday, said they were still analysing the “unmet need for mental health services for people with particularly severe and chronic mental health’’.

He said governments would “try and work out where those gaps are for people with severe needs who might not be currently in the NDIS”.

Tragic and distressing details of mental health patients’ suffering are detailed in submissions to a NSW parliamentary inquiry into mental health.

Paramedics revealed that mental health cases make up 15 per cent of their workload, and they attend 670 suicide attempts, 1559 cases of suicidal ideation, and 489 cases of self-injury every month.

Ambulances are repeatedly taking the same patients back to hospital, sometimes multiple times a day.

“A system should not be so broken that patients are made worse off by the people they are seeking help from,’’ the Australian Paramedics Association of NSW has told the inquiry.

“Paramedics are at the coal face of this crisis. We see our patients become more and more unwell over time, unable to access the right care at the right time.’’

The chair of the NSW Upper House inquiry into outpatient and community mental health care, Greens health spokeswoman and former GP Amanda Cohn, said a payroll tax levy to raise funds for mental health – already imposed on employers in Victoria and Queensland - should be “on the table’’ in NSW.

“That’s what we’re doing with mental health,’’ Dr Cohn said. “We’re leaving people just languishing on endless waitlists in the community until they’re in a state of absolute crisis, bringing them into hospital for the absolute bare minimum of (treatment) and then putting them back in the community without support.

“We wouldn’t do it with any other kind of health condition.’’

Psychiatrists have described NSW’s mental health system as “under siege, under stress and in survival mode”, with chronic shortages of psychologists and mental health workers.

“Emergency departments have become the main entry point into the mental health system for many people,’’ the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists has told the inquiry.

“The medical workforce is under unprecedented strain, with public services at risk of shrinking or closing due to lack of medical workforce.’’

The Australian Medical Association said homeless people were being rejected from Community Mental Health teams, which require patients to have a fixed address. It criticised a “fragmented and siloed’’ system.

Rural Doctors’ Association of NSW president Charles Evill said most mental health services are at or near capacity.

“In regard to attempted suicides, there seems minimal support, if any, after an accident and emergency assessment,’’ Dr Evill said. “This is a potentially fatal problem considering poor access to GPs and long waiting times and poor access to psychologists.’’

If you or someone you know is at risk of suicide, call Lifeline (13 11 14) or the Suicide Call Back Service (1300 659 467), or see a doctor.

Here is the link:

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/psychiatrists-warn-mental-health-system-is-under-siege-and-stress/news-story/6f9e3d0665e3664f71e2658f3a4b1d7b

Having, for my sins, run a large metropolitan hospital emergency department for a number of years I know from experience that these places are just not where you care for the disturbed and mentally ill. You need calm, privacy and skilled dedicated staff, which is too big an ask in a busy ED!.

More, you need access to these experts at short notice – something that they often fail to understand - and leave amateurs to try an cope with disturbed patients - who need an expert hand sooner rather than later – if they are going to be successfully cared for!

My experience is now somewhat dated but I have seen no evidence things have changed and I have to say it is the rare psychiatrist who is seized of the need to respond promptly when called – to the disadvantage of those poor souls who find themselves in EDs.

We in EDs know threatened or attempted suicide / self-harm are medical emergences and need a swift and skilled response – which we are often ill-equipped to provide!

Let me know if things have improved! As for how resources in this area can be boosted that is well above my pay-grade!

David.

Sunday, April 21, 2024

I Suspect We Have A While To Go Before We Can Declare Total Victory Over COVID-19 And Its Sequelae.

This appeared last week as a bit of a reminder.

Long Covid expert backs dedicated care clinics over seeing GPs

Exclusive

By Milanda Rout

Deputy editor of The Weekend Australian's Travel + Luxury

8:37PM April 19, 2024

The nation’s leading expert in Long Covid care has urged the federal government to back dedicated treatment clinics and abandon plans to shift the burden of patient care to GPs.

The government is leaving those suffering the debilitating effects of Long Covid – thought to be as many as 10,000 cases a month – to GPs and online support, in defiance of a federal ­parliamentary committee’s recommendation that supports funding more Long Covid rehabilitation clinics.

Professor Steven Faux, the co-founder of the Long Covid clinic at St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney, said the government’s approach was flawed and Long Covid care should be conducted in rehab clinics like his, which takes a holistic approach to treatment.

Professor Faux, the hospital’s director of pain medicine who previously spent 22 years as the director of rehabilitation, has a six- to nine-month waiting list for new patients, he says in an interview for The Weekend Australian Magazine.

“The GPs are doing their best but there’s not enough GPs, and it’s very complicated because you’ve got to rule out everything else first,” Professor Faux says.

In January of this year, 100,000 positive cases were registered in the country. That means, 10,000 people got Long Covid,” Professor Faux said. “And every month there’ll be ­another 10,000.

“There’s lower vigilance with respect to Covid vaccinations and so we expect that people will get it a little bit more. There’s been no decrease in demand at the clinic.”

An RMIT study published last October found the nation had “insufficient Long Covid clinics to meet the demand”.

The Senate committee’s Sick and Tired: Casting A Long Shadow report into Long Covid ­recommended “funding be provided in partnership with state health departments for selected public hospitals to develop multidisciplinary Long Covid clinics linked to nationally consistent referral guidelines for screening patients with challenging Long Covid complications.”

Health Minister Mark Butler has not supported the recommendation, instead stating that those living with the condition would benefit from the ­government’s commitment to “expand general practices”.

Professor Faux’s clinical team at St Vincent’s includes nurses, physiotherapists, a sleep specialist, a neurological rehabilitation expert, and a psychologist. A rehabilitation program is tailored to each patient’s needs.

“If patients are identified early and they … start treatment early, the evidence from overseas is that they recover faster,” Professor Faux said.

Here is the link:

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/long-covid-expert-backs-dedicated-care-clinics-over-seeing-gps/news-story/d4310ee45ef954e4309ce1e9987e008e

This rather feels to me that we are seeing an outburst of wishful thinking on the part of the Departmental Bureaucrats that COVID is over and we can all go beck to the way we were – even though there is good evidence specialist services will be needed for a while yet and that there is evidence that the disease has a ‘long tail’ for some small percentage of patients – who of course need care!

It is just all too easy to ignore these patients and their travails if most seem to have recovered but is is pretty unfair to pull away the chocks before all have been cared for as they needed!

I suspect there are more of these patients than the Government would lile to admit!

David.

AusHealthIT Poll Number 743 – Results – 21 April, 2024.

Here are the results of the poll.

Are You Concerned That Our Mental Health Services Are Not Reliably Identifying Potentially Dangerous Sufferers And Getting Them Effective Care?

Yes                                                                               6 (21%)

No                                                                                5 (17%)

It Is A Very Difficult Task And It Is Virtually

Impossible To Be 100% Right Consistently          18 (62%)

I Have No Idea                                                             0 (0%)

Total No. Of Votes: 29

People seem to think that identifying, catching and effectively treating all dangerous mental illness is, and probably will remain, just too hard – despite out best efforts!

Any insights on the poll are welcome, as a comment, as usual!

A fair number of votes. But also a very clear outcome! 

0 of 29 who answered the poll admitted to not being sure about the answer to the question!

Again, many, many thanks to all those who voted! 

David.

Saturday, April 20, 2024

A Company That Enables Much Of Digital Health Is Growing Like Crazy It Seems.

 This appeared last week:

NextDC feeds the ducks while they’re hungry

NextDC has played the capital markets game superbly to be on the cusp of the top-50 stocks. To stay there, it has to deliver.

Apr 11, 2024 – 11.26am

Data centre owner NextDC has hit the big leagues – its first $1 billion-plus equity raising that should help catapult it into Australia’s top-50 listed companies.

Fourteen years after floating as an $80 million micro cap, NextDC is riding a wave of customer demand for data centre space and investor appetite for AI’s picks and shovels, to fill its boots, accelerate development at new sites in Sydney and Melbourne and buy more land.

Whether you like NextDC or not – and it is a divisive stock – you have to admire its willingness to launch the “Project Blue” raising and feed the ducks while they’re hungry.

The board and management team have a capital intensive business (buying land and building data centres), a large development pipeline and a forward order book that is through the roof.

So, blessed with a share price up 52 per cent in the past year and an earnings multiple that has exploded to 44 times, it is capitalising on that support and raising $1.32 billion in growth capital – nearly double its previous biggest deal.

While NextDC still needs to spend its $1.32 billion wisely, this is what we want to see from ASX-listed companies. Boards need to be smart enough to realise when investors are willing to throw money at them, bank it in the good times, and use it to progress those growth plans.

That’s how we can have a healthy and thriving listed equity capital market, and get new names like NextDC knocking on the ASX 50’s door and growing into globally relevant public companies.

To be clear, we are not saying NextDC is perfect. It is not; but it is in the right place at the right time.

Here is the link:

https://www.afr.com/chanticleer/nextdc-feeds-the-ducks-while-they-re-hungry-20240411-p5fixx

Also we have this:

NextDC goes high-performance with $1.3b raise for new data centres

Tess Bennett Technology reporter

NextDC, the country’s largest listed developer and operator of data centres, is raising $1.32 billion to expand in Sydney and Melbourne amid record demand for cloud computing services and an artificial intelligence boom.

Shares in NextDC have surged 51.6 per cent over the past year, as investors clamour for exposure to data centres, one of the hottest assets given their key role in AI and other products that require massive computing capacity.

NextDC boss says nuclear should be on table as AI sucks up energyNextDC shares were halted on Thursday morning as the company launched a one-for-six entitlement offer at $15.40 a share, a 7.8 per cent discount to its last closing price. Chief executive Craig Scroggie said a surge in demand had prompted NextDC to bring forward its capital investment.

“NextDC continues to see significant growth in demand for its data centre services underpinned by powerful structural tailwinds,” he said.

“Amid this backdrop, we have decided to bring forward the development and fitout of key assets in Sydney and Melbourne to ensure we are able to meet this growth in demand, continue to support our customers.”

NextDC is not the only data centre operator benefiting from a jump in demand for cloud computing. AirTrunk – privately owned by Macquarie Asset Management, PSP Investments and its founder, Robin Khuda – has soared to a valuation of more than $15 billion, from just $3 billion four years ago. Its owners are entertaining bids, The Australian Financial Review’s Street Talk column has reported, with plenty of interested parties.

NextDC operates 13 data centres and is developing another nine centres, including new builds in Malaysia and New Zealand.

In February, the Brisbane-headquartered company revealed plans to open its first so-called AI factories – data centres specifically designed to house the processing units sold by chipmakers like NVIDIA.

Mr Scroggie said the facilities were likely to require 10 times the amount of energy used to power the current generation of data centres as well as new cooling methods.

“We’re going from general purpose computing to high-performance computing. That will see a generational change both in the scale and the density of computers,” he said.

Mr Scroggie said the demand for the higher-performance computing services would need to be supported by new energy infrastructure.

“We need power, we need transmission networks, we need green energy, we need more solar, we need more wind and, frankly, we need nuclear,” he said. “We have to find net zero power options that are capable of supporting energy needs when the sun is not shining and the wind is not blowing and batteries [are] not going to cut it.”

The company has not disclosed where its first AI factory would be built. Wilsons analyst Ross Barrows said he had hoped to see more colour on NextDC’s AI facilities in Thursday’s announcement.

“The capital being raised today goes a considerable way to materially expediting built capacity at its existing assets and accelerating the delivery of its development assets, but further insights into new AI-dedicated assets would have added to our understanding of NXT’s medium term growth plans,” Mr Barrows said.

E&P Capital’s Paul Mason said NextDC’s fundraising would find plenty of support among investors. “The raising is probably not a big surprise for many. We have been forecasting another raising in the next two years in our modelling of the company as a result of the very high levels of demand and associated very large build program the company is pursuing,” he said.

More here:

https://www.afr.com/technology/nextdc-raising-1-3b-for-record-data-centre-demand-20240411-p5fiz9

And lastly we have this:

NextDC boss says nuclear should be on

table as AI

Tess Bennett Technology reporter Updated Apr 11, 2024 – 5.16pm, first published at 10.44am 

The chief executive of NextDC says nuclear energy should be considered to feed the need for computing power as the company, a major data centre developer, prepares to spend more than $1 billion thanks to record demand for its services in an artificial intelligence boom.

NextDC, the country’s largest listed developer and operator of data centres, is raising $1.32 billion to expand its operations in Sydney and Melbourne.

“We need power, we need transmission networks, we need green energy, we need more solar, we need more wind and, frankly, we need nuclear,” said Craig Scroggie, NextDC’s chief executive. “We have to find net zero power options that are capable of supporting energy needs when the sun is not shining and the wind is not blowing and batteries [are] not going to cut it.” Shares in NextDC have surged 51.6 per cent over the past year, as investors clamour for exposure to data centres, one of the hottest assets due to their key role in AI and other products that require vast computing capacity.

But, as that demand increases, data centres will have to become more sophisticated, and in turn, will need more energy. In February, NextDC revealed plans to open its first so-called AI factories – data centres specifically designed to house the processing units sold by chipmakers such as Nvidia. Mr Scroggie said the facilities were likely to require 10 times the amount of energy used to power the current generation of data centres, as well as new cooling methods. “We’re going from general purpose computing to high-performance computing. That will see a generational change both in the scale and the density of computers.”

JP Morgan analyst Bob Chen said power availability was the “biggest roadblock for data centre construction” and developers would need to find green energy sources to meet their customer’s net zero emissions goals.

“One thing that is also important here is the customers of these data centres, typically your global cloud service providers like Microsoft, Amazon, Google, also have an ESG mandate and are increasingly preferring operators that can source green energy,” Mr Chen said.
Renewable hubs

Patrick Gibbons, a corporate adviser at Orizontas, wrote in The Australian Financial Review earlier this week that the energy demand from data centres could even prolong the life of coal power stations. He noted Amazon had recently acquired a nuclear-powered data centre for $US650 million ($988 million) as the industry looked for reliable power.

Andrew Richards, chief executive of the Energy Users Association of Australia, said data centres required a large, mostly flat load with strong environmental credentials and would be a growing source of demand. “I am not sure that means they automatically jump to nuclear,” he added.

“If it fits into their ESG framework then I assume they would consider it, but it’s clearly not something they could consider here for at least 15 years.”

AGL Energy plans to service data centres from renewable energy hubs based at old generation sites with plenty of network capacity, firmed by a growing fleet of batteries and pumped hydro storage.

Travis Hughes, AGL’s general manager of energy hubs, said while some data centres – such as those servicing banks – required energy all day, others had the flexibility to reduce the amount of firming power required by reducing their substantial loads via demand response.

“This is the energy system becoming smarter,” Mr Hughes said.

NextDC shares were halted on Thursday as the company launched a one-for-six entitlement offer at $15.40 a share, a 7.8 per cent discount to its last closing price. Mr Scroggie said a surge in demand had prompted NextDC to bring forward planned capital investment.

“NextDC continues to see significant growth in demand for its data centre services underpinned by powerful structural tailwinds,” he said.

“Amid this backdrop, we have decided to bring forward the development and fitout of key assets in Sydney and Melbourne to ensure we are able to meet this growth in demand, [and] continue to support our customers.”

NextDC is not the only data centre operator benefiting from a jump in demand for cloud computing. AirTrunk – privately owned by Macquarie Asset Management, PSP Investments and its founder, Robin Khuda – has soared to a valuation of more than $15 billion, from just $3 billion four years ago. Its owners are entertaining bids, The Australian Financial Review’s Street Talk column has reported, with plenty of interested parties.

NextDC operates 13 data centres and is developing another nine centres, including new builds in Malaysia and New Zealand. Wilsons analyst Ross Barrows said he had hoped for more detail on NextDC’s AI facilities on Thursday. “The capital being raised today goes a considerable way to materially expediting built capacity at its existing assets and accelerating the delivery of its development assets, but further insights into new AI-dedicated assets would have added to our understanding of NextDC’s medium-term growth plans,” Mr Barrows said.

E&P Capital’s Paul Mason said improving battery technology would help meet the sector’s growing demand for power, but other sources of energy production would also need to be considered. “The data centre industry wants to decarbonise, but it also really needs stable, reliable power which is presently difficult with renewables on numerous fronts, particularly around grid inertia and intermittency,” Mr Mason said.

Here is the link:

https://www.afr.com/technology/nextdc-raising-1-3b-for-record-data-centre-demand-20240411-p5fiz9

I have to say that with the power consumption of all these data-centres (and all the ones to follow) it is not so silly to think about the use of nuclear power – as our current grud would have to be at some risk of being overwhelmed.

He need for water (for cooling) and the level of power consumption that is likely makes it hjard to be sure renewables could cope!

David.

Friday, April 19, 2024

This Is Really Not Good Enough I Believe! We Have Regulatory Blindness In Full Flight I Fear.

This appeared last week:

Health

‘What we’re seeing is not telehealth’: alarm over doctors using AI and prescribing without seeing patients

Consumers Health Forum calls on Australian government to address ‘significant safety concerns’ about prescribing without any conversation with patient

Melissa Davey Medical editor

Thu 11 Apr 2024 01.00 AEST Last modified on Thu 11 Apr 2024 08.22 AEST

Australia’s health regulator is fielding complaints about the use of artificial intelligence during telehealth prescribing, and patients being issued with prescriptions without speaking with a doctor.

A spokesperson for the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency told Guardian Australia the agency had received 550 notifications about telehealth consults and prescribing across health professions since July 2020. Of those, 30% related to complaints about a practitioner not adequately assessing a patient, they said.

In 45 cases Ahpra identified poor telehealth prescribing practices, prompting the regulator to take action against practitioners.

“In some cases this has led to restrictions preventing practitioners from prescribing or conducting appointments via telehealth,” the spokesperson said.

Concerns raised with health regulators about telehealth included not having to consult or see a prescriber before a prescription was given; prescribing processes that felt managed by an algorithm, or artificial intelligence process; and medications costing more when dispensed on a prescription provided online or via telehealth.

Dr Elizabeth Deveny, the head of the Consumers Health Forum of Australia, called on the government to address “significant safety concerns” she had about such practices, saying a conversation between a doctor and a patient should occur, “particularly when they’re a new patient”.

“This loophole needs to be closed through better regulation … because there are significant safety concerns,” she said. “Particularly what happens if a person has a bad reaction to this new medication or product, or perhaps the health practitioner who’s doing the prescribing doesn’t have their full history and understand the other medications they’re taking.”

Deveny said she had heard of telehealth platforms prescribing products such as weight-loss drugs without live consults.

“This model of online, no-consumer-contact prescribing doesn’t meet a lot of the safety features we would normally see,” she said.

“Telehealth is a great model that helps consumers access a health practitioner using a phone or computer, allowing them to have important conversations in a way that better suits them. What we’re seeing [when live consultations do not occur] is not telehealth, and we think it has potential for significant harm.”

‘I do not provide tick-box prescribing’

Guardian Australia has reported being able to access a prescription for vapes from an online telehealth platform, despite having never been a patient of that GP and never having previously been prescribed vapes.

The prescription was sent via email almost immediately after a $40 fee was paid and an online questionnaire filled in, with no live phone or video consult required.

The doctor, Dr Carolyn Beaumont, states that her website, medicalnicotine.com.au, “utilises innovative proprietary AI to effectively achieve its aims”.

But Beaumont told Guardian Australia that AI was not used by the platform in prescription generation. She did not clarify how the platform used AI.

“Scripts are individually reviewed and actioned as appropriate,” she said.

She said her online questionnaire “covers all the requirements of taking a medical history and there is plenty of scope for ongoing follow-up as needed”.

Guidelines from Ahpra and the Medical Board of Australia, which came into effect in September 2023, state that “asynchronous, online tick-box prescribing without a real-time patient-doctor consultation is not good medical practice”.

But the guidelines do not explicitly ban the practice. “Real-time doctor-patient consultations remain key to safe prescribing,” the guidelines state.

“I do not provide tick-box prescribing,” Beaumont said. “There is scope for individualised responses and follow-up is available, including in the form of longer-term telehealth that offers preventive care for smokers.”

Ahpra does not disclose the names of doctors who are the subject of complaints and there is no suggestion that Beaumont is among them.

Beaumont has also commented about her method of prescribing without a live consult on an article about vaping on the Medical Republic website.

“It is worth addressing why I choose mostly written communication with my patients, rather than conventional phone or video consults,” she wrote.

“Firstly, timezones. I’m in Victoria, and many patients are from WA. There’s a 3 hour gap, so realistically I can’t make calls until midday. Consider also that as a whole, heavy smokers are more likely to work jobs such as construction, mining or hospitality. These jobs don’t lend themselves to taking time out for a phone consult.”

Deveny told Guardian Australia that in her view time zone differences did not justify a lack of a live consult via phone or video call.

“What happens if something goes wrong with the medication?” she said. “Is the timezone going to mean that they can’t be helped by that doctor? Who’s responsible for that person’s aftercare if the timing doesn’t work?” She said a live consultation also allowed for a more comprehensive medical history than a questionnaire.

Beaumont told Guardian Australia that ideally patients would have a regular GP, but that was rarely a reality for remote workers.

“I manage their aftercare in relation to my prescribing,” she said. “To circumvent timezone difficulties, written communication has proven the most effective modality.”

A spokesperson for the Medical Board of Australia said any practitioner who prescribed in a way not consistent with the board’s guidelines “must be able to explain how the prescribing and the management of the patient was appropriate and necessary in the circumstances”.

More here:

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2024/apr/11/doctors-ai-prescriptions-australia-concerns-consumers-health-forum

It is rather a shame our medical regulator is just so stuporous at the wheel. Harm will be done and only then will they seriously wake up and enforce the regulations which are designed to keep us all safe!

I think they should worry about the basics before getting het up about AI etc. The bottom line is that the present regulatory system is not for for purpose in this century!

David.

Thursday, April 18, 2024

The Pace Of Change In The AI Space Is Really Becoming Dizzying!

 

This appeared last week:

Google’s Gemini AI can now write your emails and create spreadsheets

It turns out Google’s new AI isn’t only good for generating images of black Nazis. Soon you’ll be able to generate spreadsheets and emails with it, too.

John Davidson Columnist

Apr 10, 2024 – 2.52pm

Google’s Gemini AI may have gotten off to the worst imaginable start in its race against OpenAI’s ChatGPT, but it’s getting back on track now.

Four months after Google infamously launched Gemini with a fake demo showing the new AI model to have near-human intelligence, and only a month after Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai was forced to email Google staff telling them Gemini’s bizarre image generation was “unacceptable”, the company has announced a slew of business-oriented Gemini applications that, it must be hoping, will offend no-one.

At its Google Cloud Next 24 convention in Las Vegas, the world’s largest advertising company said it was bringing Gemini to Google Workspace, to help workers write emails and documents, and design spreadsheet tables more easily.

Coders will also get to benefit from Gemini, through a new feature called Gemini Code Assist that the company says will help speed up programming by 30 per cent or more. The assistance will help with autocompletion of lines of code, find bugs, and help coders with “navigating security challenges”, Google Cloud vice president Brad Calder said in a statement.

But not everyone is a coder, and there’s plenty in Google’s announcements for non-coders, too.

Google Sheets, the company’s cloud-based answer to Excel, will get tables where Gemini “formats and organises data in a sleek, updated design”, Aparna Pappu, the VP and GM of Google Workspace, said in a blog post.

“Select a template from our new set of building blocks – featuring everything from project management to event planning and inventory management – so you never have to build a spreadsheet from scratch again,” she said, adding the feature will appear “in the coming weeks”.

Meanwhile, Gmail users will get Gemini in Gmail, which “helps you transform notes into a more complete email draft in a single click”, she said.

“These new experiences will be available to Gemini Enterprise and Gemini Business customers, as well as Google One AI Premium subscribers,” she said.

Here is the link:

https://www.afr.com/technology/google-s-gemini-ai-can-now-write-your-emails-and-create-spreadsheets-20240410-p5fipu

Just read this slowly to get a real sense of the pace of change we are experiencing!

I have little to add.

David.