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Quote Of The Year - Paul Shetler - "Its not Your Health Record it's a Government Record Of Your Health Information"

Friday, September 15, 2017

These Seem Like A Trial Or Two That Might Be Worthwhile – I Look Forward To The Outcomes!

This appeared last week.

SMS suicide prevention trial announced in bid to save lives

Cameron Mee
Published: September 10 2017 - 12:00AM
Survivors of suicide attempts will receive supportive text messages under a landmark trial that will be conducted by Sydney hospitals.
The text messages will feature words of support and information about how to access help for patients for up to a year after their discharge. 
The trial will start at Westmead Hospital before expanding to Nepean and Blacktown hospitals and it is hoped that the new service will complement existing treatment options.
"At Westmead's emergency department we see six to eight people each day following suicide attempts or a self-harm episode. This trial will see some of these people receive SMS messages every one to two months for one year, following their discharge from hospital," senior psychiatrist at Westmead Hospital, Dr Manish Anand, said.
"We are looking forward to closely monitoring how people respond, if it ensures a safer transition home, and if re-presentations for self-harm are reduced."
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Lifeline 13 11 14
The full article is here:
What a simple inexpensive idea. I really hope it makes a difference!
While on the mental health topic – in a totally different direction  (to Mars) we have this:

NASA trials Australian mental health tool for the treatment of astronauts

Lynne Minion | 07 Sep 2017
Preparing for a 30,000km/h take-off, orbiting earth from 75.3 million kilometres away or living on an uninhabitable planet for a couple of years could all generate some anxiety or depression, which is why NASA is funding research into an ehealth treatment tool produced by the Black Dog Institute.

As part of its plans for colonising Mars, the US space program is looking into the delivery of mental health treatments to patients up to 300 days away from earth, and myCompass could be ideal for providing interstellar assistance.

Developed by researchers at the Australian mental health not-for-profit as an interactive self-help tool, the online platform will be studied in the NASA-funded clinical trial beginning this month for possible use by astronauts on long-duration space missions.

Previous studies have shown the clinical effectiveness of myCompass in reducing mental health symptoms in earth-bound people with mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety and stress. Now the technology will be tested among “astronaut-like” adults.

Head of the Black Dog Institute’s myCompass program Dr Janine Clarke said the new study represents an unprecedented opportunity to see how effective the program can be when real-time, face-to-face psychological help is unavailable.

“With missions to Mars expected to take over two years to complete, equipping astronauts with strategies to handle not only extreme physical environments but also psychological distress is vital,” Clarke said.

“Astronauts are at a high risk of experiencing mental distress for a range of reasons. They are generally extremely high achieving, on mission they experience long-term social isolation, they confront ongoing physical strain and mental challenges including persistent threats to their safety, and they have limited access to the types of supports that many of us take for granted, including ready access to friends and family, and physical activity.”

Researching the use of myCompass by those in high-pressure conditions will determine whether ultra-remote video or text messaging with therapists is useful.
More here:
We really need to be sure this one works!
David.

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