Quote Of The Year

Quotes Of The Year - Paul Shetler - "Its not Your Health Record it's a Government Record Of Your Health Information"

or

H. L. Mencken - "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

It Seems MPs From All Over Are Lining Up To Spruik The MyHR – With Exaggeration and Simplification And A Push From The ADHA!

This release appeared a few days ago:
Policy & Politics | 31/01/2018 8:00:17 PM
Department of Health

Embrace My Health Record for simpler, safer care wherever you are

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM, MP
Minister for Aged Care
Minister for Indigenous Health
Member for Hasluck
MEDIA RELEASE
31 January 2018
Embrace My Health Record for simpler, safer care wherever you are
Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt has called on Australians, especially senior Australians, to embrace the rollout of the My Health Record, for secure, safer, more convenient care.
Joining Australian Digital Health Agency CEO Tim Kelsey for the first community information session for older Australians on My Health Record, Minister Wyatt said the patient-centred digital system helped health professionals deliver the best care.
“My Health Record empowers Australians to take better control of their health and provides secure access to patients’ health information at the point of care,” said Minister Wyatt.
“People often tell me they are tired of being asked the same questions when they go to see a health professional. This can be particularly frustrating for older Australians, who may be taking a number of medications and seeing a number of doctors. 
“I also hear examples of older people being admitted to hospital and not receiving the medications they have been prescribed, because no one knew what they were supposed to be taking.” 
My Health Record presents information from across the health system, through a GP uploading a shared health summary record, Medicare data, public and private pathology and radiology reports and hospital discharge summaries.
“My Health Record places the consumer at the centre, with the power to add, remove and restrict access to certain information,” Minister Wyatt said.
“So you get to decide who sees your health information, and all of your healthcare team can share the same information together.
“It gives Australians the freedom to travel anywhere in Australia, knowing they have instant access to safe and secure digital health records, including care plans.”   
Retired Western Australian teacher Dot Price attended the information event and features in a new video to promote My Health Record. 
“When we are traveling, My Health Record provides extra security and peace of mind for any medical situation we might find ourselves in,” Mrs Price said.
“My Health Record also provides me with the ability to upload my advanced care planning, so I know my wishes will be respected and have legal status.”
Mr Kelsey said more than five million Australians were already using My Health Record.
“The Australian Digital Health Agency is implementing the My Health Record nationally this year, delivering a system that provides universal functionality, clear and concise content and, critically, a safe and secure clinical health service for all Australians,” said Mr Kelsey. 
“My Health Record will reduce the risk of medical misadventures by collecting and storing accurate medical health records.”
Minister Wyatt said the Turnbull Government would invest $374.2 million over the next two years to continue and expand the system, allowing every Australian to have a My Health Record by December 2018, unless they prefer not to.
“I am proud of the security and privacy of the system and the clear benefits to health care,” said Minister Wyatt.
“I want senior Australians in particular to benefit from this investment, especially the many mobile ‘grey nomads’ who are enjoying our wonderful country and will be able to make the most of more connected care.” 
For My Health Record information and to register, go to https://myhealthrecord.gov.au 
Here is the link:
Then in all the little papers we get things like this:

Ken Wyatt promotes My Health Record in Guildford

February 1st, 2018, 08:30AM Hills Gazette
Ken Wyatt and Dot Price with the online health recording system. Picture: Supplied
RETIRED teacher Dot Price was one of more 100 senior residents to learn more about the Government’s new online health recording system.
She features in a video promoting ‘My Health Record’ as a safer, more convenient and safer way of storing personal health information.
Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt said the patient-centred digital system helped health professionals deliver the best care.
Australian Digital Health Agency chief executive Tim Kelsey joined the Minister in Guildford yesterday at the nation’s first community information session.
Mr Wyatt said he wanted to get the message out to the more than 8000 residents aged 65 and over in the electorate of Hasluck.
“My Health Record empowers Australians to take better control of their health and provides secure access to patients’ health information at the point of care,” he said.
“Local people often tell me they are tired of being asked the same questions when they go to see a health professional.
“This can be particularly frustrating for older Australians, who may be taking a number of medications and seeing a number of doctors.
“I also hear examples of older people being admitted to hospital and not receiving the medications they have been prescribed, because no one knew what they were supposed to be taking.”
More here:
and we get National MPs with this:

Mid North Coast Residents Urged to Embrace My Health Record for Simpler, Safer Care

02 Feb 18
Mid North Coast residents, especially seniors, are being encouraged to register online for My Health Record, for secure, safer health care.
Nationals Member for Cowper, Luke Hartsuyker, said the simple system puts local patients at the forefront and can help health professionals do their job faster.
“My Health Record is particularly useful for our many so-called ‘grey nomads’ who travel from the Mid North Coast around our nation,” Mr Hartsuyker said.
“No matter where they are, this online system gives people control over their personal health information.
“Being registered on My Health Record also gives peace of mind, that health professionals can quickly access this vital information at the point of care.”
My Health Record presents information from across the health system, through a GP uploading a shared health summary record, Medicare data, public and private pathology and radiology reports and hospital discharge summaries.
Mr Hartsuyker said My Health Record would reduce the risk of medical misadventures by collecting and storing accurate medical records.
Comprehensive operator, process, and technology controls are in place to keep My Health Record secure and protect health records from a cyber-attack.
“Individuals can also control what information is in their My Health Record, and which health care provider organisations can access the information, with an extensive range of privacy settings,” Mr Hartsuyker said.
More than five million Australians are already using My Health Record, with the Turnbull Government investing $374.2 million to further expand the system, allowing every Australian to have a My Health Record by December 2018, unless they choose to opt out.
For My Health Record information and to register, go to myhealthrecord.gov.au.
Here is the link:
Reading through the half-truths, exaggerations are just legion. This was pointed out here:

Ready or not …. here comes My Health Record!

Are you a fan of the online medical records system?
There is no shortage of grey nomads who remain deeply sceptical about the effectiveness of signing up for the Government’s highly-promoted online medical records system.
Common complaints relate to the fact that many doctors haven’t yet ‘bought into’ the system and basically that the reality on the ground simply doesn’t live up to the hype.
The rollout continues nonetheless, and the Digital Health Agency insists that any teething troubles with ‘My Health Record’ will be ironed out. To date, more than five million Australians have signed up to use it and, by the end of the year, every Australian will have a My Health Record unless they make a deliberate decision to ‘opt out’.
Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt has been out on the road this week touting the benefits of the digital system … particularly for mature-aged caravanners and motorhomers.
More here:
In the comments we see!
·  John Graham said:
I signed on to it. I find that most of my medical history is not there (or at least not visible to me) & that includes a couple of hospital stays. Unfortunately a good idea that has failed/
February 2, 2018 at 8:34 am       |       Reply to this Comment
  • John Tustin said:
Yes John,if it is anything like my aged care.com it will be a complete stuff up….
February 2, 2018 at 12:31 pm       |       Reply to this Comment
·  Jenny Mays said:
we signed up in 2011 when we commenced travelling full time and have since visited many Doctors and a few hospitals all over Australia and not one was using the ‘My Health Record’. While I believe people have the right to accessl their own record, being able to add, remove and restrict access to certain information might not give a true picture of health issues
February 2, 2018 at 8:52 am       |       Reply to this Comment
·  Possum said:
Have the same problem as Jenny – I’ve been in Hospitals in Darwin, Qld, NSW all in last two years – even the ones in each State cannot access each other. My Doctor said they cannot utilise because of login problems with Govt site System won’t interface with Windows Operating Systems – Great concept most probably better off putting Health Records in Penny Wong’s filing system at least everyone seems to have access to those files.
February 2, 2018 at 11:27 am       |       Reply to this Comment
·  Rudy said:
Joined my wife and self a long time ago, had many docs visits since then nothing on our records seems like a waist of time, doctors are not keen either with the looks of it
February 2, 2018 at 1:02 pm       |       Reply to this Comment
·  Dave said:
You ran a similar story last year and I reckon you’re going to get the same type of comments about how poorly this system works. We signed up just before we tarted our traveling 4 years ago and, like Jenny and Possum, have yet to find a medical provider (either government or private) that ha signed up for the scheme. I honestly believe the current government has major problems with technology and how it works. Just look at the NBN for example.
February 2, 2018 at 4:48 pm       |       Reply to this Comment
·  Brendan said:
I went into hospital for an angiogram. My Health Record now has a discharge summary that says I went into hospital and to refer to the attached document for the summary. The attached document, which isn’t in My Health Record but is in my GP’s record says, I had an angiogram. The test results are in a totally different document also not in My Health Record which says I don;t have much of a problem.
My Health Record doesn’t show either of my hip replacements, my mild hypertension, elevated cholesterol or osteopena. In fact apart from Medicare billing information (which doesn’t say anything about why I saw my doctor) and some scripts (which doen’t say why I have them), it doesn’t have anything at all, apart from one useless discharge summary.
I hope I never have to rely on it when I see a doctor. Fortunately I keep a hard copy and USB summary of my overall condition if I go traveling. Much more reliable and cheaper.
It also means the government doesn’t get to have a copy. Why they want a copy, I don’t know.
February 2, 2018 at 5:09 pm       |       Reply to this Comment
·  PATRICIA GOTLEY said:
This system is not working. Like all the previous comments the information on our health records is very limited and dated. Our Dr assures us all info is recorded and noted on our e health record. What a load of rubbish the last days entry was 2014.
It is a great concept if it worked. Lets hope the system will undergo a full review identifying the problems and then solving them.
February 2, 2018 at 7:28 pm       |       Reply to this Comment
·  jack alexander said:
One day,(sigh).
February 2, 2018 at 8:11 pm       |       Reply to this Comment
·  Andrew said:
What a colossal waste of taxpayers money!
We would be far better off carrying our medical records and personal information with us on a usb stick
When you get asked the same questions, just hand over the device.
February 3, 2018 at 6:52 am       |       Reply to this Comment
---- End Comments as of Midday 4 February 2018. I reckon there will be more by the time you read this.
Really enough said I reckon. Right now it is a lemon.
David.

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

It is easy to understand what constitutes FALSE NEWS when the ADHA CEO Tim Kelsey tells such a hugely wopping lie like this and the Politicians reinforce the lie; namely, “The Australian Digital Health Agency is ....... delivering a system that provides universal functionality, clear and concise content and, critically, a safe and secure clinical health service for all Australians,” said Mr Kelsey.

Oh doctor, dear doctor have you no common sense?

Anonymous said...

There certainly seems to be a difference between those expressing their views in their own words. pillows we do and say anything to have their name mentioned so it carries no creed.

Trevor3130 said...

Those comments from "greynomads" provide useful insights. The first thing to say is that people who tour the wide brown are independent, resourceful and know how to look after themselves and their stuff. If they have chronic health conditions they'd be most likely to plan for access to medications with their GP and/or pharmacist. If their needs included contentious meds such as opiates, they'd carry documents and phone contacts.
When it comes to serious past or existing conditions, they'd carry copies of letters from oncologist/endocrinologist/neurologist etc. In those cases they may have their own digitised records of imaging and invasive tests, which they'd carry on a memory stick. They would not expect the MyHR to be able to supply access to those reports.
If they have to attend a GP for incidental complaint, injury or prescription they must, however, expect to be asked each & every time those essential "screening" questions re allergies, current meds & chronic illnesses. It's those simple facts that are easiest to record on the MyHR, but I do not believe that providing total access to those records should ever replace the Q and A of a formal consultation.
Should a nomad be brought in unconscious to the Woop-woop ED, a midline thoracic scar and IHI number tattoo would be noted but treatment would proceed on established first principles before the pockets are searched for a USB stick.

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

Re: "If they have to attend a GP for incidental complaint, injury or prescription they must, however, expect to be asked each & every time those essential "screening" questions re allergies, current meds & chronic illnesses. It's those simple facts that are easiest to record on the MyHR, but I do not believe that providing total access to those records should ever replace the Q and A of a formal consultation."

https://myhealthrecord.gov.au/internet/mhr/publishing.nsf/Content/healthcare-providers-faqs?OpenDocument&cat=About%20My%20Health%20Record

Says, in the FAQs for Healthcare providers, "How can I be sure information in the My Health Record is up-to-date?"

"Clinical information you find within your patient’s My Health Record should be interpreted in much the same way as other sources of health information. It is safest to assume the information in a patient’s My Health Record is not a complete record of a patient’s clinical history, so information should be verified from other sources and ideally, with the patient."

So, a patient is gong to get asked lots of questions anyway.

And the government's claims that you won't need to remember all the details of your medication etc, rings a bit hollow, because you are going to get asked if the data in your myhr is correct. So you do need to remember it all.

If you carry your own data around with you you can confirm that you wrote it and nothing has changed. You can't do that with myhr - other people have put most of the stuff in it.

Anonymous said...

Medicalrepublic http://medicalrepublic.com.au/adharacgps-brain-fart-clinical-information-systems/12937

So not only are ADHA key marketing doctors telling patients to insist GPs pick their game up and use the MyHR, the ADHA and RACGP are telling software vendors they are less than capable and the systems are in part to blame. The ADHA seems to think it is still able to perform thing NEHTA once did. They no longer have the skills, comprehending the use of computer chips and paper clips are very different skills sets, the ADHA is not capable of having a conversation around the adoption of technology in healthcare even at the administrative applications.

The states and territories would do well to distance themselves from this joke

Anonymous said...

There are many things that can go wrong with eHRs/eMRs/Myhr, including putting an extra load on GPs, a lack of usefulness, incomplete, distorted by patents who want control over the data, etc etc.

When they reviewed the system and realised that it wasn't being used very much, what did they do? Try and make it more useful? Try and reduce the overheads on GPs? No, they decided to give everyone a MyHR. A classic bigger hammer solution.

Dumb.

Anonymous said...

Well the more they have to use it the better and more efficient they will become, it’s is basic human production line methodology. Data entry needs to be treated the same.

Anonymous said...

9:16AM. That clearly shows the true colours of ADHA my hat off to them for making a mockery of the MSIA, RACGP and Standards Australia. I trust these fine institutions save face and gently put ADHA back in its box.

Anonymous said...

That is quite an amusing article and sorry but those called out in it only have themselves to blame. Were the so blinded by PowerPoints and long chats they did not see the invoice coming? I though HL7 Aus would have been blatant enough to expose the ADHA takeover tentacles

Anonymous said...

I would not presume the MSIA are so easily pushed around. They are stating the right question. Best the ADHA goes back bullying and pushing around their staff that is about the limit of their ability.

Anonymous said...

The ADHA, dismisses those who had the insights and experience to work with the community, they happily continued to ride the momentum of previous efforts. It now seems that as the momentum of the past runs its course the ADHA is left scratching for ideas and purpose. Tim and co may have seen themselves as knights in shining armour, sadly this looks like a charge of the light brigade disaster.

The CEO and this EGM have made fools of the Government and the rest of us.

Anonymous said...

The president of the MSIA has shown true leadership here and should be commended.

Anonymous said...

I support the ADHA on this, it might be that the RACGP and the ADHA have facts and evidence to peruse this. After all both represent a large part of the community. MSIA might simply be in defensive mode.

Anonymous said...

"He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon", which means keeping as far away as possible if you must interact in some way with the Devil. Get too close and you'll be in even bigger trouble. Over many years the MSIA, under different Presidents, has repeatedly demonstrated it is incapable of learning that lesson.

Anonymous said...

After all both represent a large part of the community.
Well the RACGP might stake claim to this. The ADHA has and continues to rip the community apart.

Anonymous said...

This letter from ADHA. It has been carefully crafted and I am sure reviewed by a number of persons. Everything from ADHA comes across as carefully crafted, nothing has any free spirit or soul, be it a Board paper or a pensioners views on MyHR. The intent is most definitely to force vendors to make changes and adopt new standards and comply to them or else. My opinion of the letters language and intent - Nice but Dim

Anonymous said...

@ 10:01 I believe the ADHA is also ripping itself apart. I guess its internal culture and practice of bullying and not listening is reflected in their dealings externally. I notice the States and Territories are becoming less and less involved and. To their credit implementing proper HIT to the respective communities.

Anonymous said...

I see little evidence that the States and Territories are becoming less and less involved in that they have never really been involved except to pay lip service to the ADA by contributing pro-rata to the annual budget required to fund the ADHA!

Anonymous said...

Peter FitzSimon's Joke of the Week (SMH)

“Hello! Is this Gordon’s Pizza?” “No sir, it’s Google Pizza – we bought Gordon’s Pizza last month. Do you want your usual, sir?” “My usual? You know me?” “According to our caller ID data, the last 12 times you called you ordered an extralarge pizza with cheese, sausage, pepperoni, mushrooms on a thick crust.”

“OK! That’s what I want.” “May I suggest that this time you order a pizza with ricotta, arugula, sun-dried tomatoes, and olives on a whole-wheat gluten-free thin crust?”

“No, you may not! I don’t like vegetables.”

“Your cholesterol needs help, sir.”

“How the hell do you know?”

“We cross-referenced your mobile with your medical records, and have the result of your blood tests for the last seven years.” “Listen, I don’t want your vegetable pizza, and I take medication for my cholesterol!”

“Excuse me sir, but you don’t take your medication regularly. Our database indicates that you only filled a prescription for 30 cholesterol tablets once, at Soul Pharmacy, four months ago.

“I bought the rest at another pharmacy.” “Not according to your credit card statement.” “I paid in cash.” “Sir, you didn’t withdraw enough cash according to your bank statement.”

“I have other sources of cash.” “That doesn’t show on your last tax return, unless you bought them using an undeclared income source, which is against the law.”

“WHAT THE HELL?! Goodbye, I’m sick of Google, Facebook, Twitter, and all this crap. I’m moving to an island without internet, cable TV, mobiles and jerks watching and spying on me.”

“I fully understand sir, but you need to renew your passport first. It expired six weeks ago.”