Quote Of The Year

Quote Of The Year - Paul Shetler - "Its not Your Health Record it's a Government Record Of Your Health Information"

Sunday, June 09, 2019

AusHealthIT Poll Number 478 – Results – 9th June, 2019.

Here are the results of the poll.

Does Minister Hunt Have A Clue About Digital Health Or Is He Just Hostage To The Thinking, Beliefs And Attitudes Of The ADHA And The Department Of Health?

He Is Fully Across Digital Health And Knows What He Is Doing. 0% (0)

He Has Some Understanding But Can't Resist The ADHA's Evidence Free Claims, Spin And Propaganda. 52% (37)

He Is An Uncritical And Ignorant Follower Of The AHDA Line. 48% (34)

I Have No Idea 0% (0)

Total votes: 71

Well that was pretty clear – all think the ADHA is pretty much just doing its own thing – unconstrained by any real governance. We all know how that sort of governance works out long term!

Any insights on the poll welcome as a comment, as usual.

A more than reasonable turnout of votes, but a few more would be good.

It must have been a really easy question as 0 /71 readers were not sure what the appropriate answer was.

Again, many, many thanks to all those that voted!

David.

7 comments:

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

IMHO, both ADHA and the minister are desperate to find some sort of benefits for myhr.

What they are not interested in are the downsides. It's not as though there is no evidence of the ineffectiveness of health records, especially those aimed at patients.

Maybe they could start with this lot.

Having Access To Medical Records Is Useless For Most Patients
https://www.healthcareittoday.com/2019/06/07/having-access-to-medical-records-is-useless-for-most-patients/

Medical AI has a big data problem
https://www.axios.com/medical-ai-data-problems-041773b4-5dc8-4558-8173-46f623054627.html

Specifically:
"Electronic medical records are notoriously error-ridden"

"medical data has a usefulness half-life of just 4 months."

What's ruining medicine for physicians Difficulty using EHRs
https://www.medicaleconomics.com/business/whats-ruining-medicine-physicians-difficulty-using-ehrs

"... 61 percent of doctors believe EHRs have a negative impact on efficiency and productivity and 54 percent feel they negatively affect the physician-patient relationship.

Richard E. Anderson, MD, FACP, chairman and chief executive officer of The Doctors Company, says there are two problems with EHRs. First, they require hours of duplicative and often unnecessary data input. Second, the systems are non-intuitive, vary widely, and don’t communicate with one another.

The experience in medicine has been that EHRs actually reduce physician productivity, and often impede rather than facilitate the care of patients"

Grahame Grieve said...

Bernard, you should at least have the basic honesty to point out that those 3 articles are all US based, and there is at least some reason to expect that the situation is a lot better in this country.

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

Grahame, my apologies, I assumed that anyone reading the articles would have realised their source.

What is the evidence that the situation is better in this country?

Patients are the same, clinicians do very similar tasks, patient data is very similar and the observation:

"there are two problems with EHRs. First, they require hours of duplicative and often unnecessary data input. Second, the systems are non-intuitive, vary widely, and don’t communicate with one another."

sounds very familiar. In fact Australia's two EHR system is probably even worse than overseas.

Anonymous said...

So Grahame, it sounds very much as though, regardless of the differences between the US and Australia's health systems, Bernard thinks health records are not of much use to doctors or patients. That should make the lawyers happy. Why bother to record any information, there is no value in doing so seems to be the basis of his argument!

Long Live T.38 said...

Records need to evolve, they did when we moved from chalk and caves to entrails, from clay tablets to paper and ink, to typewriters and now to a completely new and still be understood computational form that opens up new opportunities and challenges. MyHR is designed for a time that has passed and a trajectory that is facing extinction.

The US is just different than Australia.

Anonymous said...

AnonymousJune 10, 2019 10:25 AM

You statement does the two gentlemen an injustice. Both demonstrate a capacity to be a bit more open minded than what your statement implies.

It is thinking like yours the spawns ‘death to the fax” ultimatums run by the ant-faxers rather than how do we improve on existing forms of clinical communication...

Anonymous said...

@1.09 PM You're right I was probably too hasty in concluding that medical records were useless because Bernard referred to "the experience in medicine has been that EHRs actually reduce physician productivity, and often impede rather than facilitate the care of patients". I much prefer T38's view that "records need to evolve". Perhaps that's what 9.43 AM was trying to say.