Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Dr Mukesh Haikerwal And Paul Madden Speak On The myHR And Privacy.

This appeared earlier today.

My Health Record: Is your private information protected?

The My Health Record is a computer based system designed to collate all of your desired health records into one place, with the aim of making it easier to share this information with your various healthcare providers.
However, concerns have been raised about the security of the system, with some arguing that 650,000 healthcare professionals now have unlimited access to people’s health records.
Wendy Harmer speaks to Dr Mukesh Haikerwal, Former AMA President about the potential pitfalls of the system.
And Paul Madden, Deputy Secretary in the Federal Department of Health, who is responsible for Digital Health issues including the My Health Record.
Duration: 23min 20sec
Broadcast: Tue 11 Apr 2017, 8:30am
Published: Tue 11 Apr 2017, 11:47am
Here is the link:
Enjoy. 

I do wonder why we have Paul Madden and not Tim Kelsey talking about the Department's view?
David.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

That is because Tim has abandoned Australia for a month, you will see him pop up in datapaloza in the US. Not to worry the care.data legacy has a long reach

Anonymous said...

One thing I am not clear on, Mr Madden states that a provider cannot simple search by name but needs the patients Identifier, then the last. Aller (could not find a more fair Dickinson sounding like if you tried) states that an after hours doctor could look up his health record and send him directly to hospital? How is that possible?

I agree the truth is in the middle somewhere, however I lean more towards trusting Mukesh more than Paul, I might be biased towards trusting a clinician than a career public servant that was reading statements.

Anonymous said...

I do wonder why we have Paul Madden and not Tim Kelsey talking about the Department's view?

Really David? Would you put Kelsey in front of this, he might be able to sell your soul to the data miners but he is little more than a poster boy, much the same as his 2ic is his 2ci be cuase it known that is a safe unimaginative pair of hands that takes direction from the me. In Canberra.

Paul Madden is on a mission, let no man stand in his way.

Anonymous said...

Less than 0.1% changed their privacy setting this is consistent with opt-in? Another way to look at it is we failed to ignite public interest? Of those 147 people would it safe to guess a % were more likely directly involved in marketing or supporting the roll out?

147 is pretty poor, of 650,000 people, I would expect 1470 people just because it was new and they had to check it out.

It is a failure, perhaps not of the system, but definitely a sales failure, the department heads should be given other opportunities, I here NT is short a few eHealth project teams

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

Paul Madden said "registered users can't trawl health data at random: 'A healthcare provider can't just provide a name: they need a health identifier number for that person, together with other personal information, to get their records.' "

So what happens when a patient is taken to A&E, how do they find their MyHR? I doubt most patients know or carry their HIN with them.

Terry Hannan said...

Bernard and others, I did have a patient last weekend form QLD visiting Tasmania. I offered him an e-copy of my structured record and he stated that he could get it from his MyHR in QLD. He has his laptop open on the bed table. He manages to finally find the website. Goes to log on (forgot his password then finally found it). The system then stated access will be provided to him after the phone him back with a code! Time > 5 mins. Record access 0.
It was enlightening to observe the person trying to access the system with a nil result.

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

Terry, So he has his laptop with him and so he's pretty IT savy. So why didn't he have a copy of his MyHR on his laptop all ready to access? Oh, I remember, he can't download his MyHR. A printed copy would also be very useful. Oh, I remember, he can't print it either.

Tell me again that it's MY health record?