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Friday, March 16, 2018

Yet Again The AMA Is Enthusiastically Endorsing The myHR I Think….

This appeared last week from the AMA

ADHA Claims My Health Record Expected To Improve Delivery Of Care For GPs

08 Mar 2018

The Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA) has provided an update on progress of the My Health Record and the benefits it will bring to Australian patients.
Dr Michael Crampton has highlighted how it has led to improved delivery of care for his patients, noting the importance of having easy access to allergy information for the patient, hospital discharge summaries, and other important information that a patient may not remember all the relevant details of their healthcare history.
“When we have one clear, accessible, current and accurate medicines list for every patient it will overcome a lot that goes on,” Dr Crampton said.
[For] “Older patients who are not necessarily medication smart and who are prescribed and dispensed many generic drugs there is a lot of medication confusion. For example, they don’t know that medicines have a generic name and a brand name. Doctors know the different names of the one drug. Patients don’t know that. It just causes grief.”
“My Health Record will definitely help with all of this. There is no question.”
Read more about the development of the My Health Record.
Here is the link:
What struck me in this was that the endorsement was future tense and uncertain about improvements resulting from the myHR.
The AMA fully knows there is a lot of water to flow under the bridge before the myHR is a proven and valuable system.
I am not sure just why the AMA keeps producing these rather qualified releases.
David.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Theranos story is an important lesson for Silicon Valley,” SEC’s San Francisco office director Jina Choi said in a statement. “Innovators who seek to revolutionise and disrupt an industry must tell investors the truth about what their technology can do today, not just what they hope it might do someday

Australians are the investors in the MYEHR. I think we should be feed the truth not what might be one day in some random universe

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

“When we have one clear, accessible, current and accurate medicines list for every patient it will overcome a lot that goes on,” Dr Crampton said.

a) my health record will never deliver that.

b) there are far better ways of improving the health of Australians than by spending money chasing such foolishness - how about getting people to exercise more and improve their diet?

Oh, silly me, they are/have tried that but it doesn't work - but giving people access to their medical record will work? More wishful thinking.

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

@5:12 PM
You beat me to it. I agree totally.

It's not so much the truth so much as the logical argument that justifies an outcome.

Just gathering large amounts of data is a simplistic objective. I have never seen any evidence translating that to better health outcomes and I have looked very hard. What I have found is lots of evidence that it has little value but at high cost. Neither is it innovative or transformative.

Anonymous said...

My Health Record Statistics – at 11 March 2018
Published 02 March 2018
https://myhealthrecord.gov.au/internet/mhr/publishing.nsf/Content/news-002
Clever trick

Just as well nobody relies on myhr for "clear, accessible, current and accurate" data.

Trevor3130 said...

Dr Michael Crampton has highlighted how it has led to improved delivery of care for his patients, noting the importance of having easy access to allergy information ...
Reliance on a third-party's data for the "Allergies?" part of consultations will lead to adverse outcomes.
I wonder if Dr Crampton is prepared to subject his contention to robust inquiry.

Anonymous said...

Doesn't Dr Crampton keep his own clinical system up to date? Who, other than Dr Crampton, keeps his patient's myhr up to date? WTF is this guy doing practicing medicine?

Anonymous said...

10:25 PM What do you mean by "clever trick"?.

Anonymous said...

Look at the dates.

Anonymous said...

Dates? Do you the fact that it states an uproar date? So the results are measured from 1 July 2012 upto some date before 2 March? That does not make the figures look good for 6 years

Anonymous said...

Let me explain very carefully so that even you can understand.

My Health Record Statistics – at 11 March 2018
Published 02 March 2018

The statistics were for the 11 March, but published on 02 March, 9 days earlier.

OK?

Anonymous said...

March 17, 2018 10:23 PM. WTF, pretty clear these are hand crafted and that the ADHA has not quality processes in place. One can only imagine the lack of care going on with the MyHR and other programs. They do realise healthcare is important and not something to be fluffed about with between power points and speeches.

Anonymous said...

It's a simple clerical error. The statistics as at 2 March are published on 11 March.

Bernard Robertson-Dunn said...

"It's a simple clerical error. The statistics as at 2 March are published on 11 March."

Do you work for ADHA?

a) You think simple answers are correct.
b) You haven't checked the evidence.

The evidence is in the pdf:
https://myhealthrecord.gov.au/internet/mhr/publishing.nsf/Content/137785A2DF7FF487CA257F8A0008E40D/$File/My_Health_Record_Dashboard_11March2018.pdf

Not only is the URL dated 11 March, the content of the pdf says 11 March.

Yes it is a simple clerical error, but not the one you thought.

If you look at the page source it says:
META NAME="DC.Date.Modified" SCHEME="ISO8601" CONTENT="2018-03-14"

Which means it was published to the web on or after 14 March.

The data are for 11 March, but were published a few days after.

Anonymous said...

Agree just another clerical error.

Anonymous said...

That is interesting. The ADHA is pushing digital this, digital that, but obviously has no data tooling themselves. Seems a bit rich.