Quote Of The Year

Quote Of The Year - Paul Shetler - "Its not Your Health Record it's a Government Record Of Your Health Information"

Sunday, August 12, 2018

AusHealthIT Poll Number 435 – Results – 12th August, 2018.

Here are the results of the poll.

Who Should Accept Public Accountability, And Resign, For The Mismanagement Of The Opt-Out Implementation And The Huge Additional Taxpayer Costs For A New Information Campaign ($100M+)


Health Minister Hunt 0% (1)

ADHA CEO Tim Kelsey 72% (163)

Both Of The Above 22% (50)

Someone Else 4% (8)

No One 1% (2)

I Have No Idea 0% (1)

Total votes: 225

There seems to be a near consensus that Tim Kelsey should accept responsibility. Minister Hunt needs a wrap over the knuckles at least! Only a few want to blame someone else (let us know who) and very few see no guilt.

Don’t forget to watch this video to learn what we are really facing here…..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlUQMH19BkQ (36,000 views so far!)

Any insights welcome as a comment, as usual.

A really, great turnout of votes!

It must have been a really easy question as 1/225 readers were not sure what the appropriate answer was.

Again, many, many thanks to all those that voted!

David.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Although Tim Kelsey and his fellow executives need to allowed oppertunity to spend time with family and friends and explore employment elsewhere. And yes the Minister needs to be slapped. The Minister has a large portfolio and we paid handsomely for Tim and his executives to fix the system, change the system to meet optout requirements including legal and privacy issues that have been well known for a long time and setup a positive communications programme that galvanised the community.

The reason I voted other was simply because in the ranks below the executive there is a malignant cancer in the ADHA that has through mismanagement and a culture of bullying hampered and distracted the ADHA from forming into a workable organisation. Until someone has a strength to dismantle this collection of personal relationships and ideologies not much will change for the better.

Anonymous said...

@8:50. That would be a fair assumption. The people in question seemed poorly equipped to deal with the formation of a Federal Government Agency or how to merge NEHTA and the eHealth branch. Others from the private sector backgrounds have an opinion that even in the commercial environment they lack the capability. So much effort better spent has been wasted and many good people lost in what can only be a result of protecting friends rather than making sure the best outcome is achieved. The more they fail the more they get rewarded.

Our CEO has not been setup for success.

Anonymous said...

Maybe we do not need to waste our time fighting this? The ADHA will self destruct and GPs will just ignore it. A new government will come along, review the miserable failure that will result and quietly let it die. We the people will suffer from a loss of tax dollars that could have been better spent delivering improved health care and the software industry will have, yet again, lost an opportunity to be innovative.

Such is government hubris. Will they ever learn? I doubt it.

Anonymous said...

Two votes for no one.
Who do you suppose they may be? Mr Hunt and Mr Kelsey?

Anonymous said...

The apparent mess the ADHA operations may or may not be in is certainly a factor but not one the Board has proven to be interested in.

That to one side

Communications around the MyHR, it has been poorly thought through and poorly executed. Yes they have carpet bombed organisations with leftlets and have interactive multimedia advertising (which could be said to be misleading as it does not reflect the actual behaviour of the system. It is apparent that the ADHA has not used the advisory committees, the compact partners or their own people optimally. This is evident by the surprise they received across the community, which has forced the Minister into a corner and made him look foolish.

This has resulted in messaging that has raised great debate, and not in a positive sense. The ADHA inability to predict this reaction and have counter measures in place is quite clear. In responding the ADHA has created more confusion and mistrust, further fragmenting the community. They can blame no one but themselves.

The huge expense spent on little travels to collect what few stories are available of people using MyHR should have been complemented with engagement with the rest of the actors, the ADHA obviously sort to ignore large cohorts of the community. That is apparent in the reputable professional institutions and leaders who are raising very valid concerns.

Even putting those to one side, the CEO is tarnished with his either mistakes with care.data. He has repeatedly demonstrated a greed for data and an unwillingness to work within a framework governed by ethics, trust and mutual agreement.

Anonymous said...

Their saving grace will be that as bad as this is, the PM has house full of troubles, I am not sure this would even make it in the list of stuff ups.

The Minister for Health, however, needs to save face, if he lets this go unanswered then his authority goes with it and every department and Agency under his watch will have a field day.

Anonymous said...

The MyHR project does need to be stopped. To progress under the current raft of changes means the current information available is incorrect and as result breaks the mandate of informed choice. The Minister is unable to provide revised information as any suggested changes to legislation or the ability to permanently delete records have not been enshrined in reality. To change the legislation will require a number of sections to be changed, there are also other acts that may over ride the MyHR Act and these will need to be dealt with. As for system changes to support deletion, this sounds good in theory but again is not yet designed, built and tested, nor have impact assessments been undertaken.

The ADHA is able to sue and BE sued.